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KiltedWarrior

38 months ago

Music media.
What is the best medium in your opinion - CD, MP3, Vinyl, cassette, DAT or dare I even mention 8 track( if you can remember it).
What give the best quality of sound?

In my opinion you can't beat vinyl (12 inch at 33rpm not old 78's). The musical range and quality cant be bettered. Vinyl albums may not be as robust as CD's etc but are far better in my humble opinion.
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bangorlass

  37 months ago
My hubby and I have a selection of lp's and singles on vinyl, a further selection on cassettes and a range of cd's. I don't remember the 8 track.
I used to love saving my pennies to go to the record shop and buy a single or an album - it was exciting looking round the selection. Nowadays, it's very hard to find a "record shop". I enjoyed that age, when you could peruse the records, enjoy the covers and information inside, and build a collection. It's just not the same downloading songs digitally onto the smallest, thinnest possible gadget.(In my humble opinion anyway!)
1 comments

AndyGoodall

  37 months ago
Best quality is vinyl, ease of use CD...
Vinyl May Be Final Nail in CD's Coffin
As counterintuitive as it may seem in this age of iPods and digital downloads, vinyl -- the favorite physical format of indie music collectors and audiophiles -- is poised to re-enter the mainstream, or at least become a major tributary.
Talk to almost anyone in the music business' vital indie and DJ scenes and you'll encounter a uniformly optimistic picture of the vinyl market.
"I'm hearing from labels and distributors that vinyl is way up," said Ian Connelly, client relations manager of independent distributor alliance IODA, in an e-mail interview. "And not just the boutique, limited-edition colored vinyl that Jesu/Isis-style fans are hot for right now."
Pressing plants are ramping up production, but where is the demand coming from? Why do so many people still love vinyl, even though its bulky, analog nature is anathema to everything music is supposed to be these days? Records, the vinyl evangelists will tell you, provide more of a connection between fans and artists. And many of today's music fans buy 180-gram vinyl LPs for home listening and MP3s for their portable devices.
"For many of us, and certainly for many of our artists, the vinyl is the true version of the release," said Matador's Patrick Amory. "The size and presence of the artwork, the division into sides, the better sound quality, above all the involvement and work the listener has to put in, all make it the format of choice for people who really care about music."
Because these music fans also listen using portable players and computers, Matador and other labels include coupons in record packaging that can be used to download MP3 versions of the songs. Amory called the coupon program "hugely popular."
Portability is no longer any reason to stick with CDs, and neither is audio quality. Although vinyl purists are ripe for parody, they're right about one thing: Records can sound better than CDs.
Although CDs have a wider dynamic range, mastering houses are often encouraged to compress the audio on CDs to make it as loud as possible: It's the so-called loudness war. Since the audio on vinyl can't be compressed to such extremes, records generally offer a more nuanced sound.
Another reason for vinyl's sonic superiority is that no matter how high a sampling rate is, it can never contain all of the data present in an analog groove, Nyquist's theorem to the contrary.
"The digital world will never get there," said Chris Ashworth, owner of United Record Pressing, the country's largest record pressing plant.
Golden-eared audiophiles have long testified to vinyl's warmer, richer sound. And now demand for vinyl is on the rise. Pressing plants that were already at capacity are staying there, while others are cranking out more records than they did last year in order to keep pace with demand.
Don MacInnis, owner of Record Technology in Camarillo, California, predicts production will be up 25 percent over last year by the end of 2007. And he's not talking about small runs of dance music for DJs, but the whole gamut of music: "new albums, reissues, majors and indies ... jazz, blues, classical, pop and a lot of (classic) rock."
Turntables are hot again as well. Insound, an online music retailer that recently began selling USB turntables alongside vinyl, can't keep them in stock, according to the company's director, Patrick McNamara.Vinyl May Be Final Nail in CD's Coffin
By Eliot Van Buskirk 10.29.07
As counterintuitive as it may seem in this age of iPods and digital downloads, vinyl -- the favorite physical format of indie music collectors and audiophiles -- is poised to re-enter the mainstream, or at least become a major tributary.
Talk to almost anyone in the music business' vital indie and DJ scenes and you'll encounter a uniformly optimistic picture of the vinyl market.
"I'm hearing from labels and distributors that vinyl is way up," said Ian Connelly, client relations manager of independent distributor alliance IODA, in an e-mail interview. "And not just the boutique, limited-edition colored vinyl that Jesu/Isis-style fans are hot for right now."
Pressing plants are ramping up production, but where is the demand coming from? Why do so many people still love vinyl, even though its bulky, analog nature is anathema to everything music is supposed to be these days? Records, the vinyl evangelists will tell you, provide more of a connection between fans and artists. And many of today's music fans buy 180-gram vinyl LPs for home listening and MP3s for their portable devices.
0 comments

richjatkinson_792

  37 months ago
I do like the sound of vinyl, but it's just too impractical. Digital sound is much better now - the latest re-masters of the Beatles back catalogue are fantastic.
0 comments

slugsta

  37 months ago
I am plenty old enough to remember vinyl records, they broke easily and were prone to distort if they were not stored carefully. They were also very easily scratched. Cassette tapes tended to stretch and tangle. I think the likes of CDs and MP3s are much more reliable. Even if there is a small loss of sound quality, my ears are not good enough to find this a problem.
0 comments

Gill O

  37 months ago
I do remember records (vinyl as you put it). However, I am more than happy with my CD collection . . . . . ! Gx
0 comments

kitty cate

  37 months ago
i miss all the old vinyl i loved it and still have them gathering dust up in the loft but c d and mp3 for ease of use and transporting around
0 comments

loverlass62

  37 months ago
Yes i remember the 8 track cassette and i thought it was okay, It was a lot better than the ordinary cassette as it never got damaged. I think the c ds or better as they do not scratch like the old records used to .
0 comments

amitysharma

  37 months ago
I have used every mechanism. the best mechanism i think is USB drives for the backup of the media's. I store my music files on the DVD.
0 comments

jean.gallacher

  37 months ago
i prefer cds easier to store them and can be played in the car on computer consuls and dvd players
0 comments

Mamousline

  37 months ago
Everyone still has vinyl records and they do not disappear unlike CD and DVD media are not for life
0 comments

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