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TolunaTeamEN

  29 days ago

Cold water could lead to a cure for dementia

A new study from Cambridge University has discovered that swimming in cold water might holds clues to a dementia cure.
The researchers have discovered in the blood of winter swimmers a protein that apparently can slow down the onset of dementia and even repair some of the damage this disease can cause. Professor Giovanna Mallucci, from the UK Dementia Research Institute’s Centre points out that this new lead is in its early stage, but this discovery could point researchers towards new drug treatments which may help hold dementia at bay.

From decades ago, during surgeries, doctors cooled people down in order to protect their brains. This method is still in use especially for babies, people with head injuries or people with cardiac problems. This might link the cooling down with brain diseases, like Alzheimer's, Dementia, and other neurodegenerative diseases. The connections between the cells in the case of brain illnesses are lost and this can lead to memory loss, confusion, mood swings and, even, the death of whole brain cells.

This is how cold water affects the human body: when entering in cold water your body suffers a shock, the heart rate increases and so does the blood pressure, and you feel the need to breathe very fast. It can be very dangerous if the person is not in a good shape.
The study was first conducted on mice and showed that decreasing the temperature of the body to the point of hypothermia, and then warming them up made the mice regenerated their synapses. The secret lays in a "cold-shock" protein called RBM3. The boost of this protein could help regenerate the brain cells that are dead.

After this discovery, Professor Mallucci focused her study on people in order to see if this protein can be found in human blood. It was harder to find that, because “that ethical guidelines would make it very hard to get permission to make people hypothermic”. But with the help of some volunteers, prof. Mallucci and her team could make the study. In order to see at what point the protein RBM3 kicks in, they tested the winter swimmers that voluntarily made themselves hypothermic on a regular basis but also a group of a Tai Chi club who practice beside the pool but never actually swim. The dates showed that the swimmers had elevated levels of RBM3, while the group of Tai Chi had none.

Although the study showed results in both animals and humans, cold water immersion is certainly not a potential dementia treatment. The challenge is now to find a drug that stimulates the production of the protein in the human body and, more importantly, to prove it really does help delay dementia.

What do you think about this study? Do you think this protein could really help people suffering from dementia or other conditions?

Let us know what you think in the comments below!

Influence your world,
Toluna Team
Reply
Post

shaheena660

  25 days ago
ok Reply
0 comments

shaheena660

  25 days ago
ok Reply
0 comments

kevxjones

  25 days ago
I think as with most research it needs more widespread studies before it can be accepted. It is certainly encouraging. i would leap in the cold water and swim if it greatly reduced the chances of getting any disease. Reply
0 comments

G2810572f

  26 days ago
Can it cure covid too? Reply
0 comments

G2810572f

  26 days ago
It l but cure dog is too Reply
0 comments

Jaskaurchawla

  27 days ago
Depends on weather Reply
0 comments

V2412805e

  28 days ago
You see those people who swim in the freezing cold North sea some of them are elderly. Seems to keep them in fighting fit condition. I don't think I could do it though. Reply
0 comments

Mark_W

  29 days ago
I guess it is good that they are trying lots of different things! Reply
0 comments

spartan3002

  29 days ago
I'll be interested when " Could " becomes " Will " , and not before ! Reply
0 comments

JohntyH

  29 days ago
unlikely, as I cannot see a connection Reply
0 comments
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